Compare And Contrast Essay On Of Mice And Men

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The similarity between the book and the film “Of Mice and Men” is most evident. Even so, there are a few differences, some insignificant and other crucial. However, in the majority of the scenes, the dialogs are taken literally from the book.

The first difference appears in the introduction of the film. The book starts by describing the surrounding landscape of the Salinas Valley where Lennie and George spend the night by the river. We learn that Lennie is mentally challenged and how this affected their stay at the farm where they previously worked. The film starts, however, by showing Lennie and George escaping from this farm and their journey to Salinas Valley.

Another difference that I noticed is concerning Curley’s wife. In the book there is a scene where Lennie, Candy and Crooks are gathered in Crooks’ room. After a while, Curley’s wife emerges and the atmosphere becomes unpleasant. Crooks finds the courage to stand up against her, and when he does, she verbally breaks him down. In the movie this scene never takes place, and by eliminating this incident Curley’s wife’s destructive nature stays unrevealed.

The scene where George is about to shoot Lennie is also different in the film than in the book. In the book this episode is long and George has a hard time shooting Lennie. I get the impression that George is hesitating and unsure if this is the right thing to do. In the film the scene is much shorter and George appears considerably more secure . The movie ends with a scene where George and Lennie work together on the little farm that they where planning to buy. This is not in the book at all.

Other scenes that were left out in the movie:The scene where Lennie has hallucinations about a giant rabbit and his aunt Clara.

The scene after George has killed Lennie. In the book Slim comforts George by taking him for a drink.

And the scene where Candy comes into the room when Lennie and Crooks are
talking about the little farm they are buying. In the film Crooks never finds out about the little farm.

In my opinion both the film and the book has its flaws. In the film some crucial scenes are removed, but I thought that the characters in the movie were better than in the book. In the book, I liked neither George nor Lennie. I got the impression that George was a sensitive and kind man. He always watched over Lennie and tried do the right thing. In the film George is everything he is in the book, but he is also a wise man who people can seek advice from. He has an inquisitive and contemplating look about him. I also liked Lennie better in the movie. In the book he was just a mentally challenged character, but in the film he becomes a person with real feelings and I understand his actions on another level.

I believe that this would be a better film if they had shortened it. It seems to me that the film is an unnecessarily prolonged version of the book. On the other hand, taking to many liberties when adapting this modern classic into a film would not be a smart thing to do.. Even so, I still think that the filmmakers should have left out some insignificant scenes. The story however, is brilliant; the irony in the end where George kills Lennie out of love, how the story is composed of four major issues,(the value of dreams and goals, moral responsibility, social injustice, and the bond of friendship and loyalty,) and how loneliness is one of the main emotions. The story is brilliant and genius, and only an outstanding writer like John Stenbeck can create a masterpiece like this.

George and Lennie are very similar to the other migrant workers, except for one very important thing..... they travel together...... they're a team. Their dream is to have a place of their own, settle down, and work for themselves.

George

George Milton. A migrant worker who travels from farm to farm with his mentally impaired friend Lennie during the Depression. The two dream of earning enough money to buy a small farm where Lennie can tend rabbits. By virtue of his mental superiority, George assumes a dominant role with Lennie, acting as a parent. Because Lennie tends to involve George in difficult predicaments, George must be responsible, level-headed and ready to deal with any tragedy that may arise. Despite the many problems that Lennie causes George, he stays with his simple-minded friend as a buffet against loneliness and he retains a palpable hope that the two will eventually leave the aimless life of a migrant worker to live a more fulfilling existence.

Lennie Small. A gigantic, mentally disabled man, Lennie is simplistic and docile. He obsesses over simple sensory pleasures, particularly finding great joy in touching soft things, whether a cotton dress or a soft puppy. Although Lennie is inherently innocent, he is still capable of great violence, for he lacks the capacity to control himself physically and has a great protective instinct, especially when it comes to his friend, George. Lennie dreams with George of having a small piece of land; he is obsessed with one aspect of this dream: having a small rabbit hutch where he can tend rabbits. Lennie is incapable of making decisions by himself and relies on George entirely.

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